How’s that again, Sally?

maybe this time I'll get the lyrics right

Swing it again, Sally: maybe this time I'll get the lyrics right

by Rachel Newstead

I’ve often joked that Kevin and I make the perfect team, as I hear about as well as he sees; he’ll pick up subtleties in the sound track of a cartoon that I might have misheard (or missed entirely) while I provide the visual information he can’t. There are, however, some instances in which Kevin can’t save me. I give you Exhibit A below…

Since establishing the new blog, Kevin and I haven’t quite made a clean break from the old, which remains intact. Perhaps it’s just as well, since it looks as if we received a comment on the Sally Swing review I posted in May. A fellow who calls himself “ramapith” left the following comment on the old blog recently:

Hey, guys!

After seeing Sally Swing’s modern-day reappearance on Stephen DeStefano’s blog, I did some looking for more on her and bumped into this page.
What a great review (and Sally is a great character, too… pity no more shorts with her ended up being made).

Don’t wanna mosey around with Mozart,
He wrote a symphony; so what?
Don’t want to beat it out with Beethoven;
I want my music and my biscuits hot…

So we’re no longer rhyming “hot” with itself, and the lyrics more accurately show Sally’s tastes.

Well, that’s what comes of rushing to put content up, I suppose. This was a cartoon with which Kevin was unfamiliar–I hadn’t even heard of it until a day or two before posting the review–so he didn’t have the luxury of teasing out those dodgy areas on the somewhat muddy sound track. Thus, I was flying blind–or deaf, as it were.

Perhaps the most mortifying thing for me is in thinking that a musician the caliber of Sammy Timberg would have done something so amateurish as rhyme “hot” with itself. Of course he wouldn’t.

I’d like to thank “ramapith” for commenting, and I encourage any other loyal readers to do the same. My ears will thank you.

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“NOW JUST A DARN MIN-NUT!!”, The True Essence of Bob Clampett’s “Beany and Cecil”

Our red-blooded "sea sur-pent" in puppet form (1949, above) and animated (1962, above right)

Our red-blooded "sea sur-pent" in puppet form (1949, above) and animated (1962, below right)

by Kevin Wollenweber

I was listening to the commentary tracks found on disk four of LOONEY TUNES GOLDEN COLLECTION, VOL. 3, especially John Kricfalusi’s enthusiastic talks
during some of his favorite Bob Clampett cartoons included in that program, like “GRUESOME TWOSOME” and “FALLING HARE”, noting the overall work of Bob
Clampett as a major influence for many facets of his own “REN & STIMPY”series and his ways of approaching characters that are not his own. It must
have, therefore, been a blast for John K. to have had a shot at directing and writing his own “BEANY & CECIL” series as his tribute to the man who was his artistic hero.

In the commentaries, John K. says that Bob Clampett was the king of mischief, of the double entendre, the gag that could mean something other than what you might have thought it meant as a kid viewing it for the first
time, and there are indeed times this is true. There was that gag that apparently was often cut from TV airings of “AN ITCH IN TIME” in which the dog gets bitten by the flea and  goes rolling from one corner of the room to the other, dragging his bitten posterior on the ground and yowling, pausing only for enough time to pant and say, as an aside to the audience, “Hey, I’d better cut this out. I might
get to like it!”

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